South Course

  • Hole #1
    • This may be one of the most difficult starting holes anywhere. The #1 handicap rated hole right out of the gate will get your attention quickly and set the tone for your day on the South. At 450+ yards, this slightly downhill, straight away hole is made even more difficult by a putting surface that slopes away and to the right. Bogey or worse is a possibility if you’re not ready from the opening tee shot!

  • Hole #2
    • A medium length par 3 that is made difficult by the bunkers that guard the front, left, and right sides of the putting surface. The added difficulty comes once you reach the green, especially with a front hole location as this green slopes severely from front to back and is very narrow.

  • Hole #3
    • A well placed tee shot will find the left center of the fairway between fairway bunkers on either side of the fairway. Big hitters will be able to cut the corner on this dogleg right, uphill par 4, leaving a short iron approach shot. The fun doesn’t stop there as a player will face many challenges while putting on a very undulating and steeply sloped green from front to back and also from left to right.

  • Hole #4
    • A short par 4 that doglegs to the right and is bordered by fairway bunkers on the right and heavy tree cover on the left. Most players would be smart to hit a fairway wood or hybrid from the tee leaving a mid-iron approach shot. This green may be one of the most difficult on the course as it slopes away and to the right; only the most precise iron shots will come to rest on the green!

  • Hole #5
    • The first of three par 5’s on the South. Generally straight away, a player’s tee shot will need to navigate a fairly narrow chute of trees to find the left center of the fairway which is the prime landing area. From there, two more good shots will get you home, but in the meantime avoid the fairway bunkers that are about 125 yards short of the green and avoid the left side if possible. This green has a severe false front and also slopes severely to the right on the front portion of the surface…don’t fall asleep with the putter in your hand on this one.

  • Hole #6
    • The second par 5 of the day that you will face. A tough tee shot that doglegs to the right a little bit. You will have to avoid the large sycamore tree that guards the hillside on the right to find the fairway. Most players will have to lay-up on their second shot leaving a mid-iron or short iron third to the green. This green is extremely difficult and almost too hard to describe with its severe slopes and undulations. The 6th green is the one that Tom Watson famously four-putted during the final round of the 2005 US Senior Open…need we say more!

  • Hole #7
    • A medium length par 4 at just over 400 yards will require a straight tee shot to the “fat part of the fairway”. The hole gently doglegs to the right for your second shot, but watch out as this green is on the small side and well bunkered forcing you to play an accurate second shot. You may get away running up your approach shot through the narrow opening at the front of the green, but be careful with the false front!

  • Hole #8
    • The second of the par 3’s on the front nine will require an accurate mid-iron or short iron shot. A pretty straight forward hole and what you see is what you get...a well bunkered green on all sides! Your best bet will be to fly your tee shot all the way to the green surface if you want to make par on this one.

  • Hole #9
    • Not an easy way to end your first nine on this long, slightly uphill dogleg left hole. A well placed tee shot will find the right center of the fairway avoiding the large fairway bunkers both left and right. Most players will face a very long second shot to a green that slopes significantly from front to back. A bogey or worse is in the cards here if you’re not careful!

  • Hole #10
    • The last of the par 5’s on the day and a great way to start your second nine. Your tee shot should favor the left center of this fairly generous fairway in the landing zone. Often viewed as one of the “signature holes” on the South Course, your second shot will travel sharply downhill, but don’t hit it too far as there is a large bunker about 100 yards from the green. Once again, when you reach the putting surface, you will find a very sloped green front to back making two putts difficult for most players.

  • Hole # 11
    • This uphill dogleg left hole has several options off of the tee. The big hitters can carry the fairway bunkers on the left leaving a very short iron approach to this narrow green. Most players however, will hit a fairway wood or hybrid avoiding the fairway bunkers on the left and right which will leave a mid-iron approach.
  • Hole #12
    • As you now settle into your back nine, #12 will challenge you from tee to green. The downhill, dogleg left hole playing at nearly 440 yards is well protected off of the tee with a large fairway bunker on the left side of the fairway strategically placed in the primary landing area. With a long iron or mid-iron second shot to the green, you will work hard to make a par here.

  • Hole # 13
    • The first of two par 3’s on the back nine. Most players will face a tee shot of nearly 200 yards to a green that slopes pretty dramatically from left to right. A strategically located shot will allow for the ball to feed off of the slope and down to the hole. You must avoid going left on this hole or you will be lucky to make even a bogey!

  • Hole #14
    • One of the more picturesque holes on the back nine, this gem doglegs softly to the left from the tee. Off of an elevated tee, an ideal tee shot will place you in the right center of the fairway avoiding several fairway bunkers on the left. The big hitters will need to be careful not to carry the ball into the native area on the right or the right fairway bunkers. The long, narrow kidney shaped green promises to keep you on your toes and was the site of Allen Doyle’s 75 foot birdie putt during the final round of the 2005 US Senior Open on his way to victory.

  • Hole #15
    • The second of the par 3’s on the back, this one is all you can handle. A player will be faced with a very difficult uphill tee shot with probably a hybrid or even a fairway wood. You can get away with running a ball onto the green but accuracy is premium with any shot here as the green slopes significantly from right to left and away from you. Pars are not easy to come by here!

  • Hole #16
    • This is one of the 3 most difficult holes on the entire course, there is nothing easy about #16! Players will face a downhill tee shot that will play left to right. Most players will then face a second shot that climbs back up hill pretty sharply with a hybrid or fairway wood. A massive putting surface awaits you that once again slopes from front to back and from right to left. Many good rounds have been ruined on this hole!

  • Hole #17
    • For most, #17 will be a little bit of a reprieve from the previous few holes. The best play off of the tee will be a hybrid or fairway wood to the left center of the fairway which will leave you a short iron second shot. A layup off the tee will avoid the fairway bunkers on the left side further up the fairway, but be careful of the fairway bunker on the right positioned in the prime landing zone! Accuracy on your second shot will be key especially with a green that runs away and to the right and is fast.

  • Hole #18
    • One last test awaits a player when they step onto 18 tee! The best tee shot will travel up the left side which should get a kick to the right back into the fairway. The big hitters will need to be careful of the fairway bunkers both left and right. The hole will dogleg to the left on your second shot and take note of the hole location while you’re at it, it can be deceiving from the fairway. Your last green of the day will be one of the tougher ones with some large humps in the left side and some sneaky swales elsewhere. A par will be well earned here!